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Reducing Feed Wastage

dwyerclear

Dec 28, 16

By Gilbert VandenHeuvel

Reducing Feed Wastage

If pigs prices are up or down, if corn / soybean prices are up or down, it’s always a good idea to look at your feed delivery process to remove any wastage.

One or two small reductions in your feed wastage can result in significant dollars in your pocket.

Any of us would bend-over to pick up a $5 bill, imagine finding that $5 bill every day simply by bending over to adjust a few self feeders.

A quality New Year’s resolution would be to print this list and implement a few of them during the upcoming cold months and notice how your feed bill stretches a little further.

Check list on whole farm feed wastage areas:

  • Spillage at bin during filling.  Make sure your blow pipe is secure and without holes.  Do what you have to do to keep fines to a minimum.  Spilled feed attracts rodents.

  • Spillage and moisture in storage and unloading systems.  A little silicon goes a long way to stop moisture getting in.  If it’s beyond repair, contact us for a stainless steel flex and solid auger options that will serve you for many years.

  • Self Feeder:

    • Use a well designed self feeder that is easily adjusted and allows for proper water/feed mixing.  Dwyer Mfg can source a feeder to fit your needs.self-feeder

    • Insure there are enough feeding spaces for the pigs to eat with limited competition.

    • Even distribution of feed along the feeder.

    • Position of feeder in the pen so

      • The feeder is closer to the sleeping area, not the dunging area.  Manure in the feeder will always reduce intake and increase wastage.

      • it can be easily inspected from the passageway.

    • Locate the drinker so it can be reached but not played with and flood out the feeder pan.

    • A covered feeder is best to minimize dust in the room, reduce moisture and rodents from spoiling the feed. Include a see through area so feed can still be inspected.  Dwyer Mfg is a good source of PVC board.

    • Keep the feeder well maintained so it can be adjusted and no holes or cracks leak feed out.

    • Have feed available when the pigs enter the barn.  A detail that helps reduce lag in consumption that happens when pigs are moved.

    • Clean out your feeders thoroughly between batches.  Design your system so the feeder can be flipped upside down to really clean it out.

    • Don’t over-fill the feeders, especially when pigs first enter the barn.  Pigs will waste stale feed to find fresher.

  • Grind feed ingredients properly.  An average of 700 microns has been documented to be best.  Dwyer can do a particle test for you and provide you with a quality stainless hammer  mill.

  • Using multi-phase rations will give your pigs the correct nutrition as their needs change.  Every breed and farm can be unique, so conduct some tests to see what works best at your place. Dwyer Mfg can source or build you an affordable pig and feed weighing system.

  • Use some creep feed during the piglet’s last stage in the farrowing room.  It will ready their gut for solid food in the nursery barn. Conduct creep-feederyour own trials to find out how to fine-tune this to your system.  Dwyer Mfg has plastic and stainless creep feeders or piglet rescue decks.

  • Carefully feed a farrowing sow to meet her needs during lactation and during the first week back in the breeding barn.  Uneaten feed is a direct waste that turns moldy and attracts flies.

  • Having a “hospital” or recovery pen is a great idea but make sure the feeder is designed properly for the sick pigs that will be using it.  Keep the feed fresh and accessible. Dwyer can custom build a Stainless trough feeder for any size pig.

  • Keep rodents and birds out of the barn as best you can.  Screen naturally ventilated barns and put an anti-rodent program in place. It’s best to make it someone’s regular job or it’ll never get done. Put poison in short pieces of 2 or 3 inch pipe along the walls where rodents travel.  OMAFRA’s fact sheet on rodents CLICK HERE

  • Non-pregnant sows: It is essential that all sows 6 weeks post-mating are actually pregnant. A sow which is discovered not to be pregnant in week 16 of ‘gestation’ has just consumed 175 kg (2.5x7x10) of feed since mating. On many farms, this can be as many as 7% of sows. On a 250-sow unit, this is accounts for 3 tonnes of sow feed a year.

  • Cull sows:  Once the decision to cull a sow is made, ensure that she is culled as soon as possible. Cull sows are eating 2.5 kg a day.

  • Feeding finishing pigs prior to slaughter:  To feed a pig immediately prior to slaughter, wastes 2.5 kg per pig sold. Limit transport shrinkage by providing lots of water leading up to shipping.

  • Overweight finishing pigs:  Finishing pigs must be weighed and sold into the slaughterhouse matrix. Outside the box, the pig becomes extremely expensive.  Not only do they not earn the extra feed they have consumed, but they are going to result in a penalty at the slaughterhouse, reducing their return.  Dwyer Mfg can supply weighing systems that mark and sort pigs that meet the weight settings.

  • Review culling of runt pigs: Pigs which are born small and/or are weaned as a runt, should have their survivability carefully reviewed. Small, weak born piglets have poor FCR rate and increased mortality rate.  The feed cost of these animals needs careful review.

  • Air temperature and comfort:  Ensure that you keep the pigs within their thermo-comfort zone. If the pigs are housed too cold, feed will be consumed to help keep the pig warm.

The chart below shows clearly how feed wastage adds up in a hurry.

feed-wastage-chart

Note: this report is in Australian dollars.  Currently $1 CND = $1.03 Australian

Thanks to The Pig Journal UK. Pig Veterinary Society for base of this blog.

http://www.thepigsite.com/pigjournal/articles/2169/management-practices-to-reduce-expensive-feed-wastage/

 

happy-new-year

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joy of the Season

dwyertransparent

Dec 21, 2016

By Gilbert VandenHeuvel

Joy of the Season

With the kids all out on their own, the “ba-humbug” part of me comes out much more easily.  It’s hard to go to that place with kids around the house brimming with excitement about the tree going up, wrapping presents and getting a bunch of play time with no school.  For parents it great watching the kids get along more then usual.  They plan activities together out in the snow or get out a favorite game to play together.  The older ones are more inclined to help the younger ones do things like get mom and dad’s present ready or get the toboggans ready for an afternoon of adventure out on a hill.

It seems the switch that turns the tree’s lights on also turns on the spirit of the season for me and probably lots of others.

Below is a nice video aimed at kids, but good for everyone, to learn how different cultures around the world celebrate this special season.  What struck me from this video is how there are many different traditions around the world but there is a common thread that connects us all, this is a time we all work to be nicer to our fellow man.

 

We all have family traditions around the Christmas season.  With Dutch roots in my family, we give out chocolate letters and make deep fried oliebollen and appleflappen.

Last year we set up a deep fryer in the garage, cooked up some dutch pastry and had various beverages on hand for our friends and family that came and went all afternoon.  At the end of the day your stomach might not be enjoying the 3 or 5 too many deep fried treats you had but you have a smile on your face because of the memories created.

You probably have your own too.  It might be watching a special movie from your childhood, or family hockey game, whatever it is, don’t let the “ba-humbug” feeling take root, get out of the Laze-boy chair and make some memories of your own.

Below is an interesting video of various traditions around the world.  It would be interesting to spend the next 20 Christmases visiting these countries and experience these traditions first hand.  Grab a tea or coffee and have a look.

From all of us here at Dwyer Mfg,

we wish you all the best of this special season of Good Will to All Man.

History of Big Dutchman

dwyer-d

Dec 14, 2016

By Gilbert VandenHeuvel

The History of Big Dutchman 

Dwyer has been selling and servicing Big Dutchman’s computerized liquid feeding systems for 11 years.  A lot has changed during that time here at Dwyer’s but it’s only a small part of Big Dutchman’s 78 years of history.

Big Dutchman has an interesting history that spans a number of countries.  Basically, it’s a German company started in the United States by Dutch immigrant brothers.

Continue reading for the full story.  Thanks to www.bigdutchman.com for the information.

New products coming from Big Dutchman are PRRS air inlet filters and repairable LED lighting designed for agriculture conditions.  Stay tuned for more information on these items and more.





1938dewitt-history

Brothers Richard (Dick) and Jack DeWitt, whose parents emigrated from the Netherlands to the U.S., started the company that would become Big Dutchman. The business started as a hatchery and expanded to include the production of broilers and turkeys. As growers looking for more efficient ways to raise their flocks, they designed the Big Dutchman feeder. Pictured: Jack and Dick DeWitt

 

1948

Model A (round body) chain feeder launched and sold under the “Big Dutchman” product name. At this time the company was called “Automatic Poultry Feeder Co.” It was sold in the beginning of 1949 to Mr. Carson Lamberson, of Abbottstown, Pennsylvania. With its revolutionary chain feed carrying concept, it became the first automated poultry feeder produced on a commercial scale.

 

 

1951history-big-d2

New manufacturing plant, Washington Ave., Zeeland, Michigan.

Picture: Big Dutchman location on Washington Ave.

1954

Name of company changed to Big Dutchman, Inc.

1958

Josef Meerpohl, a poultry farmer from Calveslage in Lower Saxony, Germany, joins the company as the head of sales for that country.

1959

Company’s first overseas operation is opened in the Netherlands, also under the responsibility of Josef Meerpohl.

1968

New complex inaugurated on Franklin St., Zeeland, Michigan. Founders sell the company to US Industries.

1978

Josef Meerpohl acquires Big Dutchman’s German operations.

Pictured: Big Dutchman Germany, Vechta, Gmbhistory-big-d

1985

The Meerpohl family acquires Big Dutchman from Hanson Trust, with rights on the brand for all of the world except the Americas. Under the new ownership, the Big Dutchman brand rapidly grows as a truly global organization.

 

1999

The Meerpohl family acquires the totality of Big Dutchman.

 

 2013

Big Dutchman celebrates its 75 year anniversary in 2013.




Importance Of Particle Size

logo

December 7, 2016

By: Gilbert VandenHeuvel

The Importance of Corn Particle Size in Pig Feed

FACT: If your corn isn’t ground properly (usually too coarse) you could be loosing up to $1.78 per pig in feed efficiency. As corn price goes up so does the amount of $$ gained or lost.  That’s $356 extra dollars you could have in your pocket for each truckload of 200 pigs that leaves your place.

” As grain accounts for a major component and cost in diets for livestock animals, the particle size of ground grain influences feed digestibility, feed efficiency, mixing performance and pelleting.  Therefore, periodic particle size evaluation is a necessary component of a feed manufacturing quality assurance program.”  Charles Stark & Julie Kalivoda of Kansas State University

“Particle size is ground-cornan area where producers can significantly improve feed efficiency and lower feed cost per kg of gain. For corn-based diets ranging in particle size from 1200 – 400 microns, there is a 1 to 1.5% improvement in feed efficiency for every 100 micron reduction in average particle size”  Greg Simpson, OMAFRA

The best/only way to measure particle size to determine the correct screen size is to have a particle size test done.

A test should be taken:

    –  every 500 – 700 tonnes of feed processed (as screens and hammers wear, particle size increases)

    –  change in corn moisture or source (particle size increases as drier corn goes through the same screen size)

    –  change in mill hammers and/or screen

particle-size-sieves3





Dwyer Mfg has invested in equipment to do a particle size test for you.  Bring in a representative sample of your ground corn and we’ll let you know your average particle size.

This service is free to all existing Dwyer customers and $15 for others. Next day results can be emailed to you.

The biggest opportunity to save is connected to finisher feed but there is dollars in the balance with nursery and sow feed too.

Only 50 grams of ground corn is needed, so bring in a couple of  handfuls from different areas to get a good representation of your ground feed.  Paper lunch bag is best so the sample doesn’t condensate before it gets here.

Please, no complete feed with fat added since the fat will clog up our sieves.




What is the correct particle size?ground-corn

“Current research suggests that the optimum particle size for pigs is 700-800 microns (0.7 – 0.8 mm).  It’s too expensive to grind an finer that this since the time and energy inputs often outweigh any improvement in feed efficiency.  Feed that is finer than 700 microns will produce ulcers in pigs very quickly.  Research at the University of Guelph has shown that feed with a particle size of 550 microns produced ulcers in 90% of pigs in only 2 weeks; after 4 weeks the first pig died from bleeding ulcers. ”  Greg Simpson, OMAFRA

To read the whole article CLICK HERE

It is well documented that reducing particle size has a great impact on feed efficiency. By increasing the surface area of the grain, there is greater interaction of the feed with digestive enzymes, thus improving the digestibility of nutrients. However, the optimum diet particle size is a decision that needs to be balanced between pig performance and feeding/milling efficiencies.

The key areas to look for on the analysis are the average particle size (700 to 800 microns), shape of the graph/curve (bell-shaped or normal) and less than 10% percent of the sample being too coarse (>1850 microns) or too fine (<300 microns).

Economics

If you market 8000 hogs per year, at an average feed cost of $250/tonne, reducing particle size in the grower-finisher from an average of 1000 microns to an average of 700 microns saves about $1.78/pig or $14,240/year.  Source: OMAFRA

Table 1. Effect of Particle Size on Feed Efficiency and Feed Costs

Particle Size (a)

Coarse

Medium

Fine

<1000 microns

900 to 700 microns

>600 microns

Gain:Feed

0.333

0.342

0.362

Feed:Gain

3.00

2.92

2.76

Feed Cost/MT

Feed Cost/Pig (b)

$350

$94.59

$92.11

$87.02

$300

$81.08

$78.95

$74.59

$250

$67.57

$65.79

$62.15

$200

$54.05

$52.63

$49.72

(a) Adapted from Wondra et. al. 1995b. Effects of particle size and pelleting on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and stomach morphology in finishing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 73:757.
(b) Assuming 90kg gain using on-farm mixed corn, soybean meal, premix diets.

Bring in your ground corn sample next time your in the area, it’s the simplest way to save real feed dollars.

 

Reducing Feed Wastage

dwyerclear

Dec 28, 16

By Gilbert VandenHeuvel

Reducing Feed Wastage

If pigs prices are up or down, if corn / soybean prices are up or down, it’s always a good idea to look at your feed delivery process to remove any wastage.

One or two small reductions in your feed wastage can result in significant dollars in your pocket.

Any of us would bend-over to pick up a $5 bill, imagine finding that $5 bill every day simply by bending over to adjust a few self feeders.

A quality New Year’s resolution would be to print this list and implement a few of them during the upcoming cold months and notice how your feed bill stretches a little further.

Check list on whole farm feed wastage areas:

  • Spillage at bin during filling.  Make sure your blow pipe is secure and without holes.  Do what you have to do to keep fines to a minimum.  Spilled feed attracts rodents.

  • Spillage and moisture in storage and unloading systems.  A little silicon goes a long way to stop moisture getting in.  If it’s beyond repair, contact us for a stainless steel flex and solid auger options that will serve you for many years.

  • Self Feeder:

    • Use a well designed self feeder that is easily adjusted and allows for proper water/feed mixing.  Dwyer Mfg can source a feeder to fit your needs.self-feeder

    • Insure there are enough feeding spaces for the pigs to eat with limited competition.

    • Even distribution of feed along the feeder.

    • Position of feeder in the pen so

      • The feeder is closer to the sleeping area, not the dunging area.  Manure in the feeder will always reduce intake and increase wastage.

      • it can be easily inspected from the passageway.

    • Locate the drinker so it can be reached but not played with and flood out the feeder pan.

    • A covered feeder is best to minimize dust in the room, reduce moisture and rodents from spoiling the feed. Include a see through area so feed can still be inspected.  Dwyer Mfg is a good source of PVC board.

    • Keep the feeder well maintained so it can be adjusted and no holes or cracks leak feed out.

    • Have feed available when the pigs enter the barn.  A detail that helps reduce lag in consumption that happens when pigs are moved.

    • Clean out your feeders thoroughly between batches.  Design your system so the feeder can be flipped upside down to really clean it out.

    • Don’t over-fill the feeders, especially when pigs first enter the barn.  Pigs will waste stale feed to find fresher.

  • Grind feed ingredients properly.  An average of 700 microns has been documented to be best.  Dwyer can do a particle test for you and provide you with a quality stainless hammer  mill.

  • Using multi-phase rations will give your pigs the correct nutrition as their needs change.  Every breed and farm can be unique, so conduct some tests to see what works best at your place. Dwyer Mfg can source or build you an affordable pig and feed weighing system.

  • Use some creep feed during the piglet’s last stage in the farrowing room.  It will ready their gut for solid food in the nursery barn. Conduct creep-feederyour own trials to find out how to fine-tune this to your system.  Dwyer Mfg has plastic and stainless creep feeders or piglet rescue decks.

  • Carefully feed a farrowing sow to meet her needs during lactation and during the first week back in the breeding barn.  Uneaten feed is a direct waste that turns moldy and attracts flies.

  • Having a “hospital” or recovery pen is a great idea but make sure the feeder is designed properly for the sick pigs that will be using it.  Keep the feed fresh and accessible. Dwyer can custom build a Stainless trough feeder for any size pig.

  • Keep rodents and birds out of the barn as best you can.  Screen naturally ventilated barns and put an anti-rodent program in place. It’s best to make it someone’s regular job or it’ll never get done. Put poison in short pieces of 2 or 3 inch pipe along the walls where rodents travel.  OMAFRA’s fact sheet on rodents CLICK HERE

  • Non-pregnant sows: It is essential that all sows 6 weeks post-mating are actually pregnant. A sow which is discovered not to be pregnant in week 16 of ‘gestation’ has just consumed 175 kg (2.5x7x10) of feed since mating. On many farms, this can be as many as 7% of sows. On a 250-sow unit, this is accounts for 3 tonnes of sow feed a year.

  • Cull sows:  Once the decision to cull a sow is made, ensure that she is culled as soon as possible. Cull sows are eating 2.5 kg a day.

  • Feeding finishing pigs prior to slaughter:  To feed a pig immediately prior to slaughter, wastes 2.5 kg per pig sold. Limit transport shrinkage by providing lots of water leading up to shipping.

  • Overweight finishing pigs:  Finishing pigs must be weighed and sold into the slaughterhouse matrix. Outside the box, the pig becomes extremely expensive.  Not only do they not earn the extra feed they have consumed, but they are going to result in a penalty at the slaughterhouse, reducing their return.  Dwyer Mfg can supply weighing systems that mark and sort pigs that meet the weight settings.

  • Review culling of runt pigs: Pigs which are born small and/or are weaned as a runt, should have their survivability carefully reviewed. Small, weak born piglets have poor FCR rate and increased mortality rate.  The feed cost of these animals needs careful review.

  • Air temperature and comfort:  Ensure that you keep the pigs within their thermo-comfort zone. If the pigs are housed too cold, feed will be consumed to help keep the pig warm.

The chart below shows clearly how feed wastage adds up in a hurry.

feed-wastage-chart

Note: this report is in Australian dollars.  Currently $1 CND = $1.03 Australian

Thanks to The Pig Journal UK. Pig Veterinary Society for base of this blog.

http://www.thepigsite.com/pigjournal/articles/2169/management-practices-to-reduce-expensive-feed-wastage/

 

happy-new-year

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joy of the Season

dwyertransparent

Dec 21, 2016

By Gilbert VandenHeuvel

Joy of the Season

With the kids all out on their own, the “ba-humbug” part of me comes out much more easily.  It’s hard to go to that place with kids around the house brimming with excitement about the tree going up, wrapping presents and getting a bunch of play time with no school.  For parents it great watching the kids get along more then usual.  They plan activities together out in the snow or get out a favorite game to play together.  The older ones are more inclined to help the younger ones do things like get mom and dad’s present ready or get the toboggans ready for an afternoon of adventure out on a hill.

It seems the switch that turns the tree’s lights on also turns on the spirit of the season for me and probably lots of others.

Below is a nice video aimed at kids, but good for everyone, to learn how different cultures around the world celebrate this special season.  What struck me from this video is how there are many different traditions around the world but there is a common thread that connects us all, this is a time we all work to be nicer to our fellow man.

 

We all have family traditions around the Christmas season.  With Dutch roots in my family, we give out chocolate letters and make deep fried oliebollen and appleflappen.

Last year we set up a deep fryer in the garage, cooked up some dutch pastry and had various beverages on hand for our friends and family that came and went all afternoon.  At the end of the day your stomach might not be enjoying the 3 or 5 too many deep fried treats you had but you have a smile on your face because of the memories created.

You probably have your own too.  It might be watching a special movie from your childhood, or family hockey game, whatever it is, don’t let the “ba-humbug” feeling take root, get out of the Laze-boy chair and make some memories of your own.

Below is an interesting video of various traditions around the world.  It would be interesting to spend the next 20 Christmases visiting these countries and experience these traditions first hand.  Grab a tea or coffee and have a look.

From all of us here at Dwyer Mfg,

we wish you all the best of this special season of Good Will to All Man.

History of Big Dutchman

dwyer-d

Dec 14, 2016

By Gilbert VandenHeuvel

The History of Big Dutchman 

Dwyer has been selling and servicing Big Dutchman’s computerized liquid feeding systems for 11 years.  A lot has changed during that time here at Dwyer’s but it’s only a small part of Big Dutchman’s 78 years of history.

Big Dutchman has an interesting history that spans a number of countries.  Basically, it’s a German company started in the United States by Dutch immigrant brothers.

Continue reading for the full story.  Thanks to www.bigdutchman.com for the information.

New products coming from Big Dutchman are PRRS air inlet filters and repairable LED lighting designed for agriculture conditions.  Stay tuned for more information on these items and more.





1938dewitt-history

Brothers Richard (Dick) and Jack DeWitt, whose parents emigrated from the Netherlands to the U.S., started the company that would become Big Dutchman. The business started as a hatchery and expanded to include the production of broilers and turkeys. As growers looking for more efficient ways to raise their flocks, they designed the Big Dutchman feeder. Pictured: Jack and Dick DeWitt

 

1948

Model A (round body) chain feeder launched and sold under the “Big Dutchman” product name. At this time the company was called “Automatic Poultry Feeder Co.” It was sold in the beginning of 1949 to Mr. Carson Lamberson, of Abbottstown, Pennsylvania. With its revolutionary chain feed carrying concept, it became the first automated poultry feeder produced on a commercial scale.

 

 

1951history-big-d2

New manufacturing plant, Washington Ave., Zeeland, Michigan.

Picture: Big Dutchman location on Washington Ave.

1954

Name of company changed to Big Dutchman, Inc.

1958

Josef Meerpohl, a poultry farmer from Calveslage in Lower Saxony, Germany, joins the company as the head of sales for that country.

1959

Company’s first overseas operation is opened in the Netherlands, also under the responsibility of Josef Meerpohl.

1968

New complex inaugurated on Franklin St., Zeeland, Michigan. Founders sell the company to US Industries.

1978

Josef Meerpohl acquires Big Dutchman’s German operations.

Pictured: Big Dutchman Germany, Vechta, Gmbhistory-big-d

1985

The Meerpohl family acquires Big Dutchman from Hanson Trust, with rights on the brand for all of the world except the Americas. Under the new ownership, the Big Dutchman brand rapidly grows as a truly global organization.

 

1999

The Meerpohl family acquires the totality of Big Dutchman.

 

 2013

Big Dutchman celebrates its 75 year anniversary in 2013.




Importance Of Particle Size

logo

December 7, 2016

By: Gilbert VandenHeuvel

The Importance of Corn Particle Size in Pig Feed

FACT: If your corn isn’t ground properly (usually too coarse) you could be loosing up to $1.78 per pig in feed efficiency. As corn price goes up so does the amount of $$ gained or lost.  That’s $356 extra dollars you could have in your pocket for each truckload of 200 pigs that leaves your place.

” As grain accounts for a major component and cost in diets for livestock animals, the particle size of ground grain influences feed digestibility, feed efficiency, mixing performance and pelleting.  Therefore, periodic particle size evaluation is a necessary component of a feed manufacturing quality assurance program.”  Charles Stark & Julie Kalivoda of Kansas State University

“Particle size is ground-cornan area where producers can significantly improve feed efficiency and lower feed cost per kg of gain. For corn-based diets ranging in particle size from 1200 – 400 microns, there is a 1 to 1.5% improvement in feed efficiency for every 100 micron reduction in average particle size”  Greg Simpson, OMAFRA

The best/only way to measure particle size to determine the correct screen size is to have a particle size test done.

A test should be taken:

    –  every 500 – 700 tonnes of feed processed (as screens and hammers wear, particle size increases)

    –  change in corn moisture or source (particle size increases as drier corn goes through the same screen size)

    –  change in mill hammers and/or screen

particle-size-sieves3





Dwyer Mfg has invested in equipment to do a particle size test for you.  Bring in a representative sample of your ground corn and we’ll let you know your average particle size.

This service is free to all existing Dwyer customers and $15 for others. Next day results can be emailed to you.

The biggest opportunity to save is connected to finisher feed but there is dollars in the balance with nursery and sow feed too.

Only 50 grams of ground corn is needed, so bring in a couple of  handfuls from different areas to get a good representation of your ground feed.  Paper lunch bag is best so the sample doesn’t condensate before it gets here.

Please, no complete feed with fat added since the fat will clog up our sieves.




What is the correct particle size?ground-corn

“Current research suggests that the optimum particle size for pigs is 700-800 microns (0.7 – 0.8 mm).  It’s too expensive to grind an finer that this since the time and energy inputs often outweigh any improvement in feed efficiency.  Feed that is finer than 700 microns will produce ulcers in pigs very quickly.  Research at the University of Guelph has shown that feed with a particle size of 550 microns produced ulcers in 90% of pigs in only 2 weeks; after 4 weeks the first pig died from bleeding ulcers. ”  Greg Simpson, OMAFRA

To read the whole article CLICK HERE

It is well documented that reducing particle size has a great impact on feed efficiency. By increasing the surface area of the grain, there is greater interaction of the feed with digestive enzymes, thus improving the digestibility of nutrients. However, the optimum diet particle size is a decision that needs to be balanced between pig performance and feeding/milling efficiencies.

The key areas to look for on the analysis are the average particle size (700 to 800 microns), shape of the graph/curve (bell-shaped or normal) and less than 10% percent of the sample being too coarse (>1850 microns) or too fine (<300 microns).

Economics

If you market 8000 hogs per year, at an average feed cost of $250/tonne, reducing particle size in the grower-finisher from an average of 1000 microns to an average of 700 microns saves about $1.78/pig or $14,240/year.  Source: OMAFRA

Table 1. Effect of Particle Size on Feed Efficiency and Feed Costs

Particle Size (a)

Coarse

Medium

Fine

<1000 microns

900 to 700 microns

>600 microns

Gain:Feed

0.333

0.342

0.362

Feed:Gain

3.00

2.92

2.76

Feed Cost/MT

Feed Cost/Pig (b)

$350

$94.59

$92.11

$87.02

$300

$81.08

$78.95

$74.59

$250

$67.57

$65.79

$62.15

$200

$54.05

$52.63

$49.72

(a) Adapted from Wondra et. al. 1995b. Effects of particle size and pelleting on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and stomach morphology in finishing pigs. J. Anim. Sci. 73:757.
(b) Assuming 90kg gain using on-farm mixed corn, soybean meal, premix diets.

Bring in your ground corn sample next time your in the area, it’s the simplest way to save real feed dollars.

 

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